Monday, February 6, 2012

After Twilight #1 & #2 - Review

RELIGION GETS OUT OF HAND

In After Twilight the state of Texas is trying to succeed from the United States and become a theocracy with strict religious rules and a war against terrorism in any shape way or form. Jen Frazier is a young librarian who has tried to keep her head down during the extreme Christian occupation of the government. When her sister is taken captive, she sets out on a mission to save her from Camp Purity, where many sinners go, but few return.

I read the first two issues of this series and I have some mixed feelings about it. I'll break it down the usual way by writing and then art, but I'll try to focus on the positives first and the negatives afterwards.

In terms of writing the story is one of those classic speculative fiction stories that pushes the envelope of church and state. The premise is one that actually does scare the crap out of me, so it did suck me in to that extent. But the execution of the story doesn't really keep it going, and that might be because of the pacing or the lack of information. By the second issue I feel like I don't know the climate of the United States and Texas' new authority on it's people. I just don't see it happening without some kind of other support. Maybe that's brought up in the later issues, but I felt like it was lacking.

The art style overall reminds me of something in the vein of The Unwritten from Vertigo Comics, and I like the initial character designs. But the art seems unbalanced in terms of character, background, and coloring. The lettering also seems to be a bit off in the placement of the balloons and the length of their tails.

Overall it's a solid first attempt at a comic book. As someone who recently published their own first comic and realized all the mistakes they made afterwards, I can sympathize. It's not easy to get every little thing right, especially when you're putting something out yourself, but there were just a little too many things that took me out of the story. I can recommend this book to anyone interested in the consequences of too much religious influence in government, but it really just isn't for me.

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